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Airfields.Directory for Southern Africa 5th Edition
 

Good to Know

Good to Know



Additional information every pilot should know for flying in Africa!


Medical

Travelling in Southern Africa may expose you to potentially dangerous diseases from a number of sources, i.e. diseases transmitted by contaminated food and /or water, by insects and by close contact with infected people.

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Sector Boundaries and FIR Boundaries for South Africa


Air Traffic Control is organised on a sector basis therefore, ATC requires pilots to report at various boundaries.

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Airspace Classification


Airspace is described in terms of altitude. It is broken into the two broad groups (controlled and uncontrolled airspace) then into Classes (A-G). Class A - Class E designate controlled airspace while Class F to Class G designates uncontrolled airspace. Classes B, D & E are not in use in South Africa.

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Controlled Airspace


An airspace within which an Air Traffic Control service is provided to IFR flights and VFR flights in accordance with the airspace classification. ATC requires that the pilot obeys instructions, requests clearance for any change to their flight plan, maintains radio listening watch and makes position reports at the required times and locations in order to remain protected within the airspace.

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Semi-circular Rules


Pilots are required to fly at an appropriate flight level selected according to magnetic track unless otherwise directed by ATC.

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Special Rules Area


The area of protected airspace where special – non-standard – rules are applied to promote safety efficiency and orderliness within a congested airspace.

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Morse Codes


Originally used in radio telegraphy, Morse code is still widely used in aviation. Pilots are required to understand this and be able to identify aircraft call signs as NDB’s and VOR’s still send their identifying letters by means of Morse code.

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